Sunday, 16 August 2015

Labour Party election, Jeremy Corbin

It is notable that prominent figures in the Labour Party, most notably the leadership candidates, simply do not understand why members are deserting them for someone who believes what he says. No-one wants yet another central party office political technocrat who has risen integrally through a discredited system. The repeated claims that the party must appoint a leader who makes the party electable indicates that being electable is the priority, not a set of ideals or radical policies. Burnham has belatedly scattered some radical star dust over his middling policies, but his radicalism is opportunistic and shallow. The candidates'  ganging up to denounce the election of Corbin as tantamount to the annihilation of the party is similar to the negative bullying that almost buried the "no" campaign in the Scottish referendum.  People do not like being bullied, and it is counter-productive.
The Labour Party have bought into the system of international finance and multi-national companies that operate outside international control. Saying, as senior figures do, that the party lost the election because they were too "anti-business" tells us that it has lost its heart and soul.
The other day The Guardian, without apparent irony, covered on following pages the degrading conditions in the refugee camp at Calais and the lush life in the Hamptons in the USA, where the indulgent rich grow fat on money that makes money. Such inequalities become steeper by the year. Where is the political will to do something about this on a national and global basis? Perhaps Corbin has such a will, but I doubt he can do anything about it if he has to grapple with leading such a soulless party.

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